Wednesday, January 16, 2008

Working with Developer Workplace on a laptop

As a developing consultant, working with SAP Developer Workplace can be a tedious task.

Usually you will want to start VPN connections to various places, for instance your home office, to check your mail, or whatever might be needed.

When you do this, Developer Workplace responds with restarting the J2EE engine.

Well, follow my guide here - and you won't be griefed with 20 minutes of restarting the J2EE engine, because you had to check your mail :-)

The solution is pretty simple actually, as well as the reason for why this happens.

When SAP created the Netweaver Java engine, they wheren't expecting the infrastructure to change on the fly. Therefore they bind the server directly to your external IP address.
It seems rather unnecessary, and this binding, ofcourse, can be hacked!

First of all, locate your Developer Workplace installation directory.
This is usually something like:

C:\usr\sap\<instance>
... and browse to:
.\SYS\profile

In here, you'll find a number of configuration files.

Create a backup copy of all the files in this directory.
The _JC00_ files are the Java Server configuration, and the _SC01_ files are the message server files.

Next, load up your favorite text editor (notepad) - and open the file:
<instance>_JC00_<computername>
... for example, if your installation has "AB1" as name, and your computer is called "MYCOMPUTER":
"AB1_JC00_MYCOMPUTER"

Next, locate the line with the following statement:
SAPGLOBALHOST = MYCOMPUTER
.. change it to:
SAPGLOBALHOST = localhost

Save & Close the configuration file.

Next, open up the file:
START_JC00_MYCOMPUTER

Again, locate the line with the following statement:
SAPGLOBALHOST = MYCOMPUTER
.. change it to:
SAPGLOBALHOST = localhost

Finally, do the same for the two message server configuration files.

Now restart the cluster.

Presto, your developer workplace will stop restarting when network changes takes place. You can even pull out the network cable of your laptop, hibernate your computer - and work on the train on your way home. :-)

1 comment:

Jonas Pajbjerg Daugaard said...

That is a good and usefull tip! Thanks.